Thursday, December 11, 2008

Donna Harraway

Hey everyone, I know this probably doesn’t do much good now, but here is my Donna Harraway Precies

In this beautiful am amazing essay Donna Harraway expands many of her other most famous concepts, especially those mobilized by the cyborg and on the proliferation of hybrids.

She begins this with a discussion of “nature”`stating that it is a “commonplace and a powerfully discursive construction.” Harraway is attempting to work through a model and understanding of nature (and really existence, especially embodiment,) which is not caught in the unproductive crosshairs of Modernist or postmodernism, arguing (after Latour,) that we have “never been modern.”

She movingly describes bodies as material semiotic generative nodes” which materialize in social interaction among humans and non-humans, including machines and other instruments.

She introduces, and later in the article, fleshes out a model based on the human-immune system, writing: “So while the late-twentieth century immune system, for example, is a construct of an elaborate apparatus of bodily production, neither the immune system nor any other of biology’s world-changing bodies-like viruses or an ecosystem – is a ghostly fantasy.

Movingly, Harraway discusses the corporeality of theory, that it is necessarily material, bodily, and literal.

Using a semiotic grid of A. Real Space: Earth; B. Out Space: The Extraterrestrial; Not B. Inner Space: The Biomedical Body; and Not A. Virtual Space: SF, Harraway’s essay weaves through close readings of technological advertisements, t-shirt logos, and space chimp narratives to flesh out her thesis on nature, artificiality, embodiment and technology.

Whether it is a read contrasting the relationship of fetuses to mother’s bodies to Amazonian inhabitants to the Amazon jungle (who is speaking thus?) and the assumptions from which such arguments are made or an unpacking of the misogynist- racist-imperialist under girding of a photograph of Jane Goodall holding hands with a monkey (the chimp touches her, anointing her as science to speak for it, nature, wrapped un in complex (and very visible) histories of miscegenation.)

One of the most lovely stretches (beside its entirety) is Harraway’s personal tale about the intervention and controversy of Surrogate Other’s, their infiltration into a government testing site (using a floral-print polyester snake-worm with “lovely dragon eyes,”) and the unpacking of the semantics, and images of their name and shirts (describing the world as an amniotic sac and mother simultaneously, the kind of descriptive “monstrous” hybrids, the spaces of the margins, that Harraway works.

Finally at the end emerges her discussion of the cyborg reading in the Lynn Randolph painting Cyborg (1989) “the full circle of the noisey semiotic square, finding it a rainbow of political semiology for wily transnational techno science studies as cultural studies.”

I am interested an always very moved at her reads of visual imagery, like ads, and the extreme importance it carries for her theoretically and politically, what, as cultural produces do we make of her reads and its implications for our practice.

Donna Harraway

Hey everyone, I know this probably doesn’t do much good now, but here is my Donna Harraway Precies

In this beautiful am amazing essay Donna Harraway expands many of her other most famous concepts, especially those mobilized by the cyborg and on the proliferation of hybrids.

She begins this with a discussion of “nature”`stating that it is a “commonplace and a powerfully discursive construction.” Harraway is attempting to work through a model and understanding of nature (and really existence, especially embodiment,) which is not caught in the unproductive crosshairs of Modernist or postmodernism, arguing (after Latour,) that we have “never been modern.”

She movingly describes bodies as material semiotic generative nodes” which materialize in social interaction among humans and non-humans, including machines and other instruments.

She introduces, and later in the article, fleshes out a model based on the human-immune system, writing: “So while the late-twentieth century immune system, for example, is a construct of an elaborate apparatus of bodily production, neither the immune system nor any other of biology’s world-changing bodies-like viruses or an ecosystem – is a ghostly fantasy.

Movingly, Harraway discusses the corporeality of theory, that it is necessarily material, bodily, and literal.

Using a semiotic grid of A. Real Space: Earth; B. Out Space: The Extraterrestrial; Not B. Inner Space: The Biomedical Body; and Not A. Virtual Space: SF, Harraway’s essay weaves through close readings of technological advertisements, t-shirt logos, and space chimp narratives to flesh out her thesis on nature, artificiality, embodiment and technology.

Whether it is a read contrasting the relationship of fetuses to mother’s bodies to Amazonian inhabitants to the Amazon jungle (who is speaking thus?) and the assumptions from which such arguments are made or an unpacking of the misogynist- racist-imperialist under girding of a photograph of Jane Goodall holding hands with a monkey (the chimp touches her, anointing her as science to speak for it, nature, wrapped un in complex (and very visible) histories of miscegenation.)

One of the most lovely stretches (beside its entirety) is Harraway’s personal tale about the intervention and controversy of Surrogate Other’s, their infiltration into a government testing site (using a floral-print polyester snake-worm with “lovely dragon eyes,”) and the unpacking of the semantics, and images of their name and shirts (describing the world as an amniotic sac and mother simultaneously, the kind of descriptive “monstrous” hybrids, the spaces of the margins, that Harraway works.

Finally at the end emerges her discussion of the cyborg reading in the Lynn Randolph painting Cyborg (1989) “the full circle of the noisey semiotic square, finding it a rainbow of political semiology for wily transnational techno science studies as cultural studies.”

I am interested an always very moved at her reads of visual imagery, like ads, and the extreme importance it carries for her theoretically and politically, what, as cultural produces do we make of her reads and its implications for our practice.

CLIPART COMICS



Final Project by Peter Max Lawrence
http://petermaxlawrence.com/PWP/CLIPARTCOMICS/01/0101_00.html

Wednesday, December 10, 2008

Locative media and the city

Ran across this, and it peaked my interest.

"...locative and mobile media and how they relate to urban culture and questions of identity...“MySpace urbanism” – the condition of cities saturated with media networks, where physical space is intersected with layers of personalised, spatial orientation."

Reminds me of the Debord, the Situationists and their exploration of psychogeographies.

Final Project!!!!

Hi Everybody!! For my final project I did some illustrations for "Maneki Neko", by Bruce Sterling...Also, at the bottom is an advertisement of my take on the Pokkecon mentioned in the story.....Please Enjoy!! Good luck with finals everybody!













My site BAMTRON.COM

Recently I have been really interested in HTML or the Internet as a tool and medium. I have some issues with using the web as a space to show one's work but still see the practicality or inescapable accessibility. The artist websites I have seen use it like a business card, usually really cut and dry information with strict parameters. What you don't see a lot is artists approaching it from the another angle and treating it like they would their work. Seems simple enough but it was really hard for me to throw out my impulses to make my site "readable" and "understandable." I feel that this attempt is a step in the right direction because it's a compromise between conveying information effectively while still keeping my conceptual ideas in tact.

Please check it out, feedback appreciated:

www.bamtron.com

Garfield minus Garfield



http://garfieldminusgarfield.net/

Tuesday, December 09, 2008

For my presentation

Good Evening everyone.
On Thursday we will be participating in the show Let's Paint TV with artist John Kilduff! A live webcast from www.stickam.com
We will be tuning into his show at 11 or as close to that time as we can.
Check out his website!
http://letspainttv.com/

Here's a cool video of John in action!
http://www.funnyordie.com/videos/4c8244ff76/mr-lets-paint-get-a-pie-s-in-his-face-from-letspainttv

Sunday, December 07, 2008

Facebook and the Social Dynamics of Privacy

Clay Shirky posted on Boing Boing, an article by James Grimmelmann entitled Facebook and the Social Dynamics of Privacy. Thought someone might be interested.

Saturday, December 06, 2008

The drug war...

more reports from more failed war...

http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2008/12/03/einstein-insanity-and-the-war-on-drugs/

eye see you!

Film maker implants camera into eye...

http://blog.wired.com/gadgets/2008/12/eye-spy-filmmak.html

Thursday, December 04, 2008

James Boyle's "The Public Domain"

Oh, and James Boyle has a new book out called The Public Domain: Enclosing the Commons of the Mind. Boing Boing has more here. Free download here.

Benkler on Infrastructure Investment

Ran across this article by Yochai Benkler about investing in information infrastructure.

Ubuntu Studio

Since we talked about it, this is the open source operating system of creative apps, Ubuntu Studio.

Update: For those interested, there is also artsoftware.org which has a large resource of open source art focused software. And the list of software that you install with Ubuntu Studio (if you don't want to install a new OS) is here. Of note on that list are GIMP, Blender and Audacity. I am also big fan of Pure Data (or PD) which is the open source Max/MSP, which was written by Miller Puckett, the original author of Max/MSP (and the MSP in Max/MSP).

A couple of other projects to mention are Processing and it's hardware sister project, Arduino. If anyone is interested, Chris Palmer teaches a class here on Arduino called Activating Objects (which I happen to TA. Funny how that works, huh?)

Enjoy!!

Just thought this would be appropriate....

....any ladies out there need $7,000?

Bring Me My Philips Mental Jacket

In the article Bring Me My Philips Mental Jacket Slavoj Žižek takes a stab at tackling the complicated issue of bioethics and ends where we normally do, with more questions than answers. He begins with concerns of manipulating the human body and turning it into a nonhuman being, and in turn completely obliterating nature as we know it. This seems to be a recurring idea, and one of the most significant arguments in the article. Mr. Žižek simply cannot fathom a world where bioengineering is in practice. In fact he doesn’t have any positive feedback at all, and much of his argument seems to be fear based. He tends to hold on to the traditional definitions of life as we know it, and brings to light the issue of morality vs. not knowing. One of the reasons for arguing against not knowing is because in many cases science dispels many myths of past generations. Particularly of an argument which he brings up, the conflict between made and spontaneous, the more we learn in science the more we realize there is less and less spontaneity that we thought. I’m not arguing for bioethics, he makes good points, such as worrying about major corporations controlling the actions of humans through chip implants. But his fear tends to overbear his legitimate concerns and is distracting from many of the good points he makes.

Wednesday, December 03, 2008

Lessig Launches Open Transition Principles for Obama

Lawrence Lessig, who wrote 'Code is Law' from our second week of readings this term, is teaming up with some folks from Moveon.org and others to present a set of principals for Obama's "open transition."

"President-elect Obama has made a very clear commitment to changing the way government works with its citizens. To this end, we offer these three principles to guide the transition in its objective to build upon the very best of the Internet to produce the very best for government."
http://www.open-government.us/

Its nice to know people are organizing in opposition to Legal Barriers that aim to prevent Sharing, but i did find one sentence in the opening paragraph a little telling of a certain "faith" in the Internet as the best fucking shit in the world.

I learned about the site on Slashdot.com where there is a good discussion on the topic in the comments box.

Laptops 4 children in developing countries

We have often discussed in class the issues of technology and the internet addressability. Here is an interesting organization that working with that issue. http://laptop.org.
I have some issues with organization manly hat it is sold through amazon but it is worth why to check out

Tuesday, December 02, 2008

TECHSPLOITATION

So the ol’ in and out is really just “a massive genetic engineering project known as patriarchy”? Huh? Annalee Newitz sarcastically, but also in all seriousness, argues in her article TECHSPLOITATION: Breeding the Future that so called “natural” breeding has lost anything natural about it because it has been skewed by the dominating patriarchal elite to control what kind of babies will be produced by women who have been handpicked. She also states that this hierarchy isn’t all that different or any worse than genetic engineering because it also uses the selecting processes doctors would use to create their perfect human species. So what’s all the hoopla about?

Her concern about this entire mess isn’t the means which life is brought into the world, but rather the problem of overpopulation. It’s a rather touchy subject- we wouldn’t be in such a global crisis for resources and space if there were less people in the world and we could consume and exist in a less devastating way. This is something I assume we have all thought about in reading this article and the reasons for the endurance of overpopulation are rather bleak for obvious reasons. 1) It’s little too late to deal with overpopulation immediately because the people who have been born can’t be unborn. 2) The people who intentionally or accidentally participate in producing babies believe, for the most part, in the fundamental right for two consenting adults to create life whenever they want to. Mandatory population control isn’t all that appealing, because it’s seen as a loss of the freedom of choice. In China, for example, the one child policy was implemented in 1979. Only 35% of the population is subjected to this policy and has been estimated to have prevented 250 million births. Some benefits have been economic growth, decreased environmental impact and better health care services. Some criticisms are that it has had effects on the female population, has created more abortions and infanticides, more abandoned and orphaned children and has created a “Four-two-one” problem in which the single child is put in a position to take care of both parents and four grandparents.

Newitz's solution seems like a reasonable one- to eliminate the stigma surrounding people who choose not to reproduce and to actually thank them for ridding us of the awful brats! More people could and should make a conscious decision, instead of a selfish or unconscious one, to do their part in saving our species. Some questions that arise from this are: How do you convince people to care about the survival of earth when they currently are doing nothing to resolve easy problems? Especially if they are not in a position to care. Is it selfish to have a lot of children? What is a reasonable number? And what would the solution be to eliminate peoples illogical, but instinctual desire to have children? Some solutions, all of which I can see immediate problems with but like the idea of, are to perhaps buy a permit to have a child, take a test to prove parental ability, be drawn in a lottery, be assigned a timeline with marked potential procreation periods so that not too many people are born at once, or share multiple children with multiple families.


"One-child policy." Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. 1 Dec 2008, 16:47 UTC. 2 Dec 2008

Keywords Wiki

We set up a wiki to collaborate on the keywords project. You can help collaborate at http://tecblog.pbwiki.com/

Monday, December 01, 2008

Making Art and Culture Thrive in a Hybrid Economy

Making Art and Culture Thrive in a Hybrid Economy -- Stanford law professor Lawrence Lessig believes heavy-handed enforcement of intellectual property rights may quash creativity and innovation. He joins us to discuss his new book titled, "Remix: Making Art and Culture Thrive in the Hybrid Economy."

88.5 fm


http://www.kqed.org/epArchive/R812011000

FINAL

Many of you will be presenting original work connected to the themes of our course on the last day as your final project. Please remember that together with this presentation you should hand in a short description of the project and its connection to a text or texts from our class that I can use as a reference in assessing your work.

Those of you who would rather not do such a presentation are welcome to produce a short (5pp.) final essay responding to the following prompt:
What is the shape and what might be the significance of a transformation from a mass mediated public sphere into more p2p networked public sphere? Choose any two texts from the course to describe how, in your own view, the emerging peer-to-peer networked public sphere differs most significantly from the mass mediated public sphere that preceded it.

I have no expectation at all about how sweeping, how deep, how hopeful, how fragile, how illusory you have come to believe this transformation truly is, nor do I have any expectation about what each of you will finally decide the significance of this transformation truly amounts to.

Berube

Well, I've looked all over the place, but to no avail. When Berube migrated his site some of the essays available on the old site vanished down the memory hole and the beautiful essay I assigned for Thursday is among them. I cannot find it anywhere else. Unless somebody has had luck finding it through some other route I suppose we'll have to confine our discussion to the remaining three pieces Thurs. The essay became the basis for a wonderful book by the same title that I recommend to your attention. Hope your holiday went well and that everybody is working on their keywords assignment. Word about the final forthcoming in my next post.